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Northern Ireland: The Troubles: From The Provos to The Det, 1968-1998 (A History of Terror) by Kenneth Lesley-Dixon

Northern Ireland

It is, of course, no secret that undercover Special Forces and intelligence agencies operated in Northern Ireland and the Republic throughout the 'troubles', from 1969 to 2001 and beyond. What is less well known is how these units were recruited, how they operated, what their mandate was and what they actually did. This is the first account to reveal much of this hitherto unpublished information, providing a truly unique record of surveillance, reconnaissance, intelligence gathering, collusion and undercover combat. An astonishing number of agencies were active to combat the IRA murder squads ('the Provos'), among others the Military Reaction Force (MRF) and the Special Reconnaissance Unit, also known as the 14 Field Security and Intelligence Company ('The Det'), as well as MI5, Special Branch, the RUC, the UDR and the Force Research Unit (FRU), later the Joint Support Group (JSG)). It deals with still contentious and challenging issues as shoot-to-kill, murder squads, the Disappeared, and collusion with loyalists. It examines the findings of the Stevens, Cassel and De Silva reports and looks at operations Loughgall, Andersonstown, Gibraltar and others.


This Hostel Life by Melatu Uche Okorie and Dr. Liam Thorton

This Hostel Life

This Hostel Life tells the stories of migrant women in a hidden Ireland. From a day in the life of women queuing for basic supplies in an Irish direct provision hostel to a young black woman’s depiction of everyday racism in Ireland, her nuanced writing shines a light on the injustice of the direct provision system and on the insidious racism experienced by migrant women living in Ireland. A third story, set in a Nigeria of the past, tells of a woman’s life destroyed by an ancient superstition and her fierce determination to carry on, a quality Okorie believes is universally shared by women. There is also essay by Liam Thornton (UCD School of Law) explaining the Irish legal position in relation to asylum seekers and direct provision.


The Great Cover-Up: The Truth About Michael Collins at Beal na Blath by Gerard Murphy

The Great Cover-Up

Why were both sides of the Civil War divide deliberately evasive when it came to the death of Michael Collins? Why were they still trying to effect cover-ups as late as the 1960s? Determined to find the truth despite the trails of deception left by many of the key players, Gerard Murphy, a scientist by trade, set out to find answers. Previous writers have tended to concentrate on the reminiscences of survivors. Murphy instead focuses on the data that appeared in the immediate wake of the ambush, before attempts could be made to conceal the truth. He also examines newly released material, and has carried out a forensic analysis of the ambush site based on photographic evidence of the aftermath recently discovered in a Dublin attic. Mike Murphy, editor of Atlas of the Irish Revolution (CUP, 2017), has drawn a detailed map of the site to complement this analysis. These investigations seriously question the version of events currently accepted by historians. Collins was not killed by an accidental shot during a haphazard ambush. He was assassinated, having been sentenced to death by Republicans for the crime of treason. The sentence would appear to have been expedited by a core group of Cork anti-Treatyites, led by supposed `neutrals' such as Florence O'Donoghue. Collins was drawn into a trap at Beal na Blath by the promise of peace talks when it became apparent that he was to visit Cork - an itinerary leaked by individuals within the National Army who abetted the plot. The fatal shot was most likely fired by a sniper, from a position directly south of where Collins was standing - where, according to all published accounts, there were no IRA men. This compelling account exposes a decades-long cover-up, unearthing overwhelming evidence, overlooked for almost a century, of what really happened at this crucial juncture in Irish history.


Why Did They Lie?: The Irish Civil War, the Truth, Where and When It Began by Jack Kiernan

Why Did They Lie

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Stinging Fly Stories by Editors Sarah Gilmartin and Declan Meade

Stinging Fly Stories

Stinging Fly Stories collects 40 short stories first published in the Stinging Fly magazine. It is a celebration of our first twenty years as a home for new writers and new writing, highlighting work by 40 different authors.


Stacking the coffins: Influenza, war and revolution in Ireland, 1918-19 by Ida Milne

Stacking the coffins

The 1918-19 influenza pandemic disrupted Irish society and politics. Stilling cities and towns as it passed through, it closed schools, courts and libraries, quelled trade, crammed hospitals, and stretched medical doctors to their limit as they treated hundreds of patients each day. It became part of a major row between nationalists and the Government over interned anti-conscription campaigners. When one campaigner died days before the 1918 general election, Sinn fein swiftly incorporated his death into their campaign. Survivors interviewed by the author tell what it was like to suffer from this influenza; families of the bereaved speak of the change to their lives. Stacking the coffins is the first Irish history of the disease to include statistics to analyse which groups were most affected. It also draws on the memories of child sufferers telling their stories.


Parent Alert! How To Keep Your Kids Safe Online by Will Geddes and Nadia Sawalha

Parent Alert

This practical go-to guide explains all the digital dangers kids face when they visit chat rooms, share selfies, use apps, and explore the internet.


Cheeky Treats: 70 Brilliant Bakes and Cakes by Liam Charles

Cheeky Treats

Cheeky Treats is a cookbook like no other, packed with fantastic flavours, wonderfully creative bakes, and fun and beautiful photography that captures Liam's personality and flair. Warning: if you're looking for a Victoria Sponge recipe - look elsewhere!


From the Corner of the Oval Office: One woman’s true story of her accidental career in the Obama White House by Beck Dorey-Stein

From the Corner of the Oval Office

In 2012, Beck Dorey-Stein was just scraping by in Washington DC when a posting on Craigslist landed her, improbably, in the Oval Office as one of Barack Obama's stenographers. She joined the elite team who accompanied the president wherever he went, recorder and mic in hand. On whirlwind trips across time zones, Beck forged friendships with a tight group of fellow travellers - young men and women who, like her, left their real lives behind to hop aboard Air Force One in service of the president. But as she learned the ropes of protocol, Beck became romantically entangled with a colleague, and suddenly, the political became all too personal. 


Eat Shop Save: Recipes & mealplanners to help you EAT healthier, SHOP smarter and SAVE serious money at the same time by Dale Pinnock

Eat Shop Save

Focusing on the time-poor in particular, these delicious meals will put a smile on the fussiest of eaters and entice families with chapters such as: Quick After Work Suppers, Favourites with a Facelift and Something Sweet (but good for you). Food is just the beginning. Using smart shopping and meal planning as a basis, you'll find tips to get organised, save money and free up precious time.


The Art of Logic: How to Make Sense in a World that Doesn't by Eugenia Cheng

Art of Logic

Emotions are powerful. In newspaper headlines and on social media, they have become the primary way of understanding the world. But strong feelings make it more difficult to see the reality behind the rhetoric. In The Art of Logic, Eugenia Cheng shows how mathematical logic can help us see things more clearly - and know when politicians and companies are trying to mislead us.


Eye Can Write: A memoir of a child’s silent soul emerging by Jonathan Bryan

Eye Can Write

Jonathan Bryan has severe cerebral palsy, a condition that makes him incapable of voluntary movement or speech. He was locked inside his own mind, aware of the outside world but unable to fully communicate with it until he found a way by using his eyes to laboriously choose individual letters, and through this make his thoughts known. In Eye can Write, we read of his intense passion for life, his mischievous sense of fun, his hopes, his fears and what it's like to be him. This is a powerful book from an incredible young writer whose writing ability defies age or physical disability - a truly inspirational figure.


Spinning Silver by Naomi Novik

Spinning Silver

WILL DARK MAGIC CLAIM THEIR HOME? Miryem is the daughter and granddaughter of moneylenders, but her father's too kind-hearted to collect his debts. They face poverty, until Miryem hardens her own heart and takes up his work in their village. Her success creates rumours she can turn silver into gold, which attract the fairy king of winter himself. He sets her an impossible challenge - and if she fails, she'll die. Yet if she triumphs, it may mean a fate worse than death. And in her desperate efforts to succeed, Miryem unwittingly spins a web which draws in the unhappy daughter of a lord. Irina's father schemes to wed her to the tsar - he will pay any price to achieve this goal. However, the dashing tsar is not what he seems. And the secret he hides threatens to consume the lands of mortals and winter alike. Torn between deadly choices, Miryem and Irina embark on a quest that will take them to the limits of sacrifice, power and love. In this fairy tale-inspired novel, Naomi Novik weaves a rich, multi-layered tapestry that is a joy to read.


Careless Love by Peter Robinson

Careless Love

A young local student has apparently committed suicide. Her body is found in an abandoned car on a lonely country road. She didn't own a car. Didn't even drive. How did she get there? Where did she die? Who moved her, and why? Meanwhile a man in his sixties is found dead in a gully up on the wild moorland. He is wearing an expensive suit and carrying no identification. Post-mortem findings indicate he died from injuries sustained during the fall. But what was he doing up there? And why are there no signs of a car in the vicinity? As the inconsistencies multiply and the mysteries proliferate, Annie's father's new partner, Zelda, comes up with a shocking piece of information that alerts Banks and Annie to the return of an old enemy in a new guise.


On Bone Bridge by Maria Hoey

On Bone Bridge

Kay Kelly has always envied pretty, privileged Violet-May Duff, but the two young girls come from very different worlds. Suddenly befriended by Violet-May, Kay finds herself welcomed into the grand Duff house, where, charmed by Violet-May's sister, the ethereal Rosemary-June, and intrigued by Mrs Duff, a woman with a past, she falls helplessly in love with Violet-May's brother Robbie. It all seems too good to be true. And it is. One mild September afternoon the three young girls take Violet-May's baby brother for a walk in his pram. What happens on Bone Bridge that day will change all their lives forever. Now in her thirties, Kay's path crosses once more with the Duff family and it doesn't take her long to realise that something is very wrong. With the life of a child clearly threatened, Kay is forced to accept that what happened all those years ago on Bone Bridge has come back to haunt her. Now, not only must she resurrect painful memories, but the time has come to finally face up to terrible truths, even if it means putting her own life in danger.


The First Sunday in September by Tadhg Coakley

First Sunday in September

With its unique subject matter and structure akin to Donal Ryans 'The Spinning Heart', 'The First Sunday in September' is a must-read. Tadhg Coakley wonderfully captures the excitement of All-Ireland day. Having re-mortgaged his home a hungover Clareman gambles the last of his money on his county to win. Sarah Taylor attends the final with her partner, Conor Dunlea, wondering when to tell him that she s pregnant. Tim Collins watches the match from the stands, his gaze repeatedly falling on the Cork captain, Sean Culloty, whom he and his wife, Evelyn, gave up for adoption years earlier. Clare star forward Cillian McMahon struggles under the weight of expectation. Cork s talisman Darren O Sullivan waits for the sliotar to fall from the sky, aware that his destiny is already set. These are just a few of the characters whose lives we join for a day. A mix of Elizabeth Strout's 'Olive Kitteridge' and Chad Harbach's 'The Art of Fielding'.


The Confession by Jo Spain

The Confession

Late one night a man walks into the luxurious home of disgraced banker Harry McNamara and his wife Julie. The man launches an unspeakably brutal attack on Harry as a horror-struck Julie watches, frozen by fear. It looks like Harry's many sins - corruption, greed, betrayal - have finally caught up with him. An hour later the intruder, JP Carney, hands himself in, confessing to the assault. The police have a victim, a suspect in custody and an eye-witness account, but Julie remains troubled. Has Carney's surrender really been driven by a guilty conscience or is this confession the first calculated move in a deadly game?


Just Before I Died by S. K. Tremayne

Just Before I Died

It was just a patch of ice. Just a bit of bad luck. But it was nearly enough to kill Kath Redway, spinning her car into Burrator Reservoir in the beautiful Dartmoor National Park. Miraculously, Kath escapes her accident with a few bruises and amnesia. She is shocked but delighted to be back in her remote moorland farmhouse with her handsome husband Adam, and her shy, gifted daughter Lyla. She’s alive! But her family is not so delighted. Her husband is cold, even angry. Her daydreaming daughter talks ever more strangely, about a 'man on the moor'. Then, as chilling fragments of memory return, Kath realizes her 'accident' was nothing of the kind. And now her life collapses into a new world of darkness, menace, and terror.


Record of a Spaceborn Few (Wayfarers 3) by Becky Chambers

Record of a Spaceborn Few

Centuries after the last humans left Earth, the Exodus Fleet is a living relic, a place many are from but few outsiders have seen. Humanity has finally been accepted into the galactic community, but while this has opened doors for many, those who have not yet left for alien cities fear that their carefully cultivated way of life is under threat. Tessa chose to stay home when her brother Ashby left for the stars, but has to question that decision when her position in the Fleet is threatened. Kip, a reluctant young apprentice, itches for change but doesn't know where to find it. Sawyer, a lost and lonely newcomer, is just looking for a place to belong. And when a disaster rocks this already fragile community, those Exodans who still call the Fleet their home can no longer avoid the inescapable question: What is the purpose of a ship that has reached its destination?


The Irish Dad's Survival Guide to Pregnancy by David Caren

Irish Dad's Survival Guide

Updated edition of this light and accessible guide for expectant dads which offers an honest and modern account of pregnancy from a dad's perspective. Combining real-life experiences from a fraternity of Irish fathers and an expert panel of midwives, obstetricians, psychologists and family finance advisors, The Irish Sad's Survival Guide to Pregnancy [& Beyond...] will accompany the expectant Dad throughout each trimester, mood change, the labour ward and those first few months of new family life.


The Legacy of Armstrong House by A. O'Connor

Legacy of Armstrong House

2017 – At Armstrong House, Kate and Nico Collins are looking forward to a bright future with their young son Cian. When archaeologist Daniel Byrne arrives in the area to investigate life there during the Great Famine, he soon crosses paths with Kate. Through Daniel’s work, Kate is horrified todiscover that a vicious sexual assault occurred in their home in the 1860s when the occupants were Nico’s ancestors Lord Edward and his wife Lady Anna. Kate sets out to use all her investigative skills to discover the circumstances of the crime, the identity of the victim and the guilty party.

1860s – After Lawrence, the long-awaited heir to the Armstrong Estate, is born Lord Edward and Lady Anna take great joy in watching him grow up. But somebody else is watching – Edward’s cousin Sinclair who has always felt cheated of the Armstrong legacy by the unexpected birth of Lawrence. As Anna’s past comes back to haunt her, life at the house is a tangled web of deceit, blackmail and betrayal that shatters in the summer of 1865.

2017 – As Kate’s detective work edges closer to discovering the truth behind the assault, she and Daniel uncover a mystery that goes much deeper. Kate realises that if the truth is ever revealed it will not only destroy the legacy of the Armstrong family but also her marriage to Nico.


A 1950s Irish Childhood: From Catapults to Communion Medals by Ruth Illingworth

A 1950s Irish Childhood

To the young people of today, the 1950s seem like another age. But for those who played, learned and worked at this time, this era feels like just yesterday. This delightful collection of memories will appeal to all who grew up in 1950s Ireland and will jog memories about all aspects of life as it was.


The Puberty Book by Wendy Darvill and Kelsey Powell

The Puberty Book

Children and teenagers usually have lots of questions about what happens to them during puberty. Since its first publication The Puberty Book has helped over 140,000 families answer those questions by providing up-to-date information on sex and sexuality, health and wellbeing, relationships, pregnancy and birth. It answers commons questions asked by boys and girls aged 9-14 such as: What does it feel like to have a period? How are sperm made? Does sex hurt? What's a wet dream? How does the milk get into breasts? How do you ask a girl on a date?

This bestselling book was inspired by the authors’ real work with real kids and real parents in real situations. This book is suitable to be given to your child so they can read it alone, and it can also be used as a valuable resource for parents.


Beyond the Border: The Good Friday Agreement and Irish Unity after Brexit by Richard Humphreys

Beyond the Border

Beyond the Border is a vital and even-handed exploration of how the Agreement provides a peaceful path towards resolving Ireland s ultimate constitutional dilemma.


Exhibiting Art in Georgian Ireland by Irish Georgian Society

Exhibiting Art in Georgian Ireland

Edited by Dr David Fleming, Dr Ruth Kenny and William Laffan, with contributions from Victoria Browne, Dr Paul Caffrey, Donough Cahill, Logan Morse and Dr Brendan Rooney. The catalogue evaluates these stimulating years; assessing Ireland’s first introduction to exhibition culture and the significant contribution it made to an increasingly self-confident national school of Irish art.


The Weekend Dad by Alison Walsh

The Weekend Dad

The Weekend Dad is a heartwarming story of friendship, parenthood, love and what it is to be good enough.


Rage-In: Trolls and Tribulations of Modern Life by Tara Flynn

Rage-In

The world is a mess and bestselling author and comedian Tara Flynn is raging. Well, sometimes. Mostly she's shocked, bemused, irreverent and wondering where the kindness went. Depends on the week, really. 'Rage-In' is a collection of essays providing a personal look at our modern world. Written in Tara's distinctive voice - conversational, witty and easy to read - we are guided through many of today's major issues, be it Emperor Trump, Brexit, an imaginary bunker for the impending apocalypse, trolls, being a Feminazi, or how pastels are actually THE WORST. With humour and empathy - as well as the occasional bout of rage - Tara Flynn tackles modern life and wonders whether anger is really the best way to survive it.


Notes on a Nervous Planet by Matt Haig

Notes on a Nervous Planet

The world is messing with our minds. Rates of stress and anxiety are rising. A fast, nervous planet is creating fast and nervous lives. We are more connected, yet feel more alone. And we are encouraged to worry about everything from world politics to our body mass index.

- How can we stay sane on a planet that makes us mad?

- How do we stay human in a technological world?

- How do we feel happy when we are encouraged to be anxious?

After experiencing years of anxiety and panic attacks, these questions became urgent matters of life and death for Matt Haig. And he began to look for the link between what he felt and the world around him. Notes on a Nervous Planet is a personal and vital look at how to feel happy, human and whole in the twenty-first century.


Kaiser: The Greatest Footballer Never To Play Football by Rob Smyth

Kaiser

1980s Rio de Janeiro.

There’s only one king in this city and he’s got the mullet, swagger and fake ID to prove it. Introducing Carlos Henrique Raposo, known to all as KAISER. This guy’s got more front than Copacabana beach. He’s the most loveable of rogues with the most common of dreams: to become a professional footballer. And he isn’t about to let trivial details like talent and achievement stand in his way. . . not when he has so many other ways to get what he wants. In one of the most remarkable football stories ever told, Kaiser graduates from abandoned slumdog to star striker, dressing-room fixer, superstar party host and inexhaustible lover. And all without kicking a ball.

He’s not just the king… he’s the Kaiser.


Beautiful Liars by Isabel Ashdown

Beautiful Liars

Eighteen years ago Martha said goodbye to best friend Juliet on a moonlit London towpath. The next morning Juliet's bike was found abandoned at the waterside. She was never seen again. Nearly two decades later Martha is a TV celebrity, preparing to host a new crime show... and the first case will be that of missing student Juliet Sherman. After all these years Martha must reach out to old friends and try to piece together the final moments of Juliet's life. But what happens when your perfect friends turn out to be perfect strangers...?


A Brush with Death: A Susie Mahl Mystery (Pet Detective Mystery) by Ali Carter

A Brush with Death

Agatha Christie meets Downton Abbey in this delightful new series introducing pet portraitist and amateur super-sleuth, Susie Mahl. In the village of Spire, murder is afoot. Rich landowner Alexander, 9th Earl of Greengrass is caught with his trousers down in the village graveyard before meeting a gruesome end. Luckily Susie Mahl happens to be on hand. With her artist’s eye for detail and her curious nature she is soon on the scent of the murderer…


Where the Missing Go by Emma Rowley

Where the Missing Go

MY NAME IS KATE.

I volunteer at a missing persons helpline - young people who have run away from home call me and I pass on messages to their loved ones, no questions asked. I don't get many phone calls, and those I do are usually short and vague, or pranks.

But today a girl named Sophie called.

I'm supposed to contact her parents to let them know their child is safe. The problem is, Sophie isn't safe. AND SOPHIE IS MY DAUGHTER.


A Whole Lotta Love: Florence Love 3 by Louise Lee

A Whole Lotta Love

Florence Love became a Private Investigator for all the right reasons. She's extraordinarily nosy, it sounds cool on paper and she needed to find her missing mum. Now she knows Bambi Love is hiding out in Italy - in a cloud of secrets and Chanel No. 5. Every family has its skeletons, but Flo's lot are a particularly special case. And how is she supposed to get over her heart-stealing ex, who holds all the answers but refuses point-blank to ever see her again? It's going to take a whole lot of love, sweat and tears to uncover the astonishing truth.


Somewhere Beyond the Sea by Miranda Dickinson

Somewhere Beyond the Sea

Seren MacArthur is living a life she never intended. Trying to save the Cornish seaside business her late father built – while grieving for his loss – she has put her own dreams on hold and is struggling. Until she discovers a half-finished seaglass star on her favourite beach during an early morning walk. When she completes the star, she sets into motion a chain of events that will steal her heart and challenge everything she believes. Jack Dixon is trying to secure a better life for daughter Nessie and himself. Left a widower and homeless when his wife died, he’s just about keeping their heads above water. Finding seaglass stars completed on Gwithian beach is a bright spark that slowly rekindles his hope. Seren and Jack are searching for their missing pieces. But when they meet in real life, it’s on the opposing sides of a battle. Jack is managing the redevelopment of a local landmark, and Seren is leading the community campaign to save it. Both have reason to fight – Seren for the cause her father believed in, Jack for his livelihood. But only one can win. With so much at stake, will they ever find what they are really looking for?


The Summer Maiden (The River Maid, Book 2) by Dilly Court

The Summer Maiden (The River Maid, Book 2)

 

The second book in a stunning new series from Sunday Times bestseller, Dilly Court.

1873. When Carrie Manning’s father dies her mother, Esther, is heartbroken. Essie leaves London to convalesce with her good friend Lady Alice, and it is down to Carrie to look after her family and take charge of the shipping company that her father has left behind. But the company is in dire straits, forcing Carrie seek work as a companion to Maria Colville. When Carrie and Maria try to track down Maria’s mother, they have no idea of the secrets that they will discover. Secrets that link the Colvilles, the Mannings and figures from the past who return to England. Carrie’s journey is as unpredictable as the waters that link the rival shipping companies, but will her determination be enough to preserve the legacy of her family’s name?


Mine by Susi Fox

Mine

They've stolen your baby. After waking from an emergency caesarean, you're dying to see your new baby. But when you're introduced something is wrong.

This is not your child.

The nurses assure you that the baby is yours.

Your husband believes them. And so does your father.

But how can you be wrong? You're a doctor. You know how easily mistakes are made.

When everyone is against you, do you trust your instincts?

You know only one thing . . .

You must find your baby.


Grace by Paul Lynch

Grace

Early one October morning, Grace’s mother snatches her from sleep and brutally cuts off her hair, declaring, ‘You are the strong one now.’ With winter close at hand and Ireland already suffering, Grace is no longer safe at home. And so her mother outfits her in men’s clothing and casts her out. When her younger brother Colly follows after her, the two set off on a remarkable journey in the looming shadow of their country's darkest hour. The broken land they pass through reveals untold suffering as well as unexpected beauty. To survive, Grace must become a boy, a bandit, a penitent and, finally, a woman – all the while afflicted by inner voices that arise out of what she has seen and what she has lost. Told in bold and lyrical language by an author who has been called 'one of his generation's very finest novelists' (Ron Rash), Grace is an epic coming-of-age novel and a poetic evocation of the Irish famine as it has never been written.


Daisy's Vintage Cornish Camper Van by Ali McNamara

Daisy's Vintage Cornish Camper Van

When Ana inherits a broken-down camper van from her best friend, she takes the chance for a quick trip to Cornwall - some sea air and fish and chips on the beach is just the tonic she needs. But St Felix has bigger plans for Ana. She discovers a series of unsent postcards, dating back to the 1950s, hidden in the upholstery of the van. Ana knows that it's a sign: she'll make sure that the messages reach the person that they were meant for. And as the broken-down van is restored to gleaming health, so Ana begins to find her way back to happiness.


Warlight by Michael Ondaatje

Warlight

It is 1945, and London is still reeling from the Blitz and years of war. 14-year-old Nathaniel and his sister, Rachel, are apparently abandoned by their parents, left in the care of an enigmatic figure named The Moth. They suspect he might be a criminal, and grow both more convinced and less concerned as they get to know his eccentric crew of friends: men and women with a shared history, all of whom seem determined now to protect, and educate (in rather unusual ways) Rachel and Nathaniel. But are they really what and who they claim to be? 


A Honeybee Heart Has Five Openings by Helen Jukes

A Honeybee Heart Has Five Openings

Entering her thirties, Helen Jukes feels trapped in an urban grind of office politics and temporary addresses – disconnected, stressed. Struggling to settle into her latest job and home in Oxford, she realises she needs to effect a change if she’s to create a meaningful life for herself, one that can accommodate comfort and labour and love. Then friends give her the gift of a colony of honeybees – according to folklore, bees freely given bring luck – and Helen embarks on her first full year of beekeeping. But what does it mean to ‘keep’ wild creatures? In learning about the bees, what can she learn of herself? And can travelling inside the hive free her outside it? 

As Helen grapples with her role in the delicate, awe-inspiring ecosystem of the hive, the very act of keeping seems to open up new perspectives, deepen friendships old and new, and make her world come alive. A Honeybee Heart Has Five Openings is at once a fascinating exploration of the honeybee and the hive, the practices of honey-gathering and the history of our observation of bees; and a beautifully wrought meditation on responsibility and care, on vulnerability and trust, on forging bonds and breaking new ground.


Nine Lives: My Time As MI6's Top Spy Inside al-Qaeda by Aimen Dean and Paul Cruickshank

Nine Lives

As one of al-Qaeda’s most respected bomb-makers, Aimen Dean rubbed shoulders with the mastermind of the 9/11 attacks and swore allegiance to Osama bin Laden himself. As a double agent at the heart of al-Qaeda’s chemical weapons programme, he foiled attacks on civilians and saved countless lives, brushing with death so often that his handlers began to call him their spy with nine lives. This is the story of how a young Muslim, determined to defend his faith, found himself fighting on the wrong side – and his fateful decision to work undercover for his sworn enemy. From the killing fields of Bosnia to the training camps of Afghanistan, from running money and equipment in Britain to dodging barrel bombs in Syria, we discover what life is like inside the global jihad, and what it will take to stop it once and for all.


A Place for Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza

A Place for Us

A Place for Us catches an Indian Muslim family on the eve of the eldest daughter’s wedding. As Hadia’s marriage -- one chosen of love, not tradition -- gathers the family back together, her parents Rafiq and Layla must come to terms with the choices that their two daughters, and their estranged son Amar, have made. Weaving through time, we see the detail of family life, all the crucial and tiny moments, through the eyes of each family member. And as Hadia, Huda and Amar attempt to carve out a life for themselves, they must reconcile their present culture with their parent’s faith, tread a path between the old world and the new and learn how the smallest decisions can lead to the deepest betrayals.


Corduroy Boy by David Rice

Corduroy Boy

Corduroy Boy is a coming-of-age novel in which a scrupulous and deeply-troubled Catholic boy grows gradually to manhood and maturity, mentored by a dedicated teacher, while both his family and his elite boarding school lurch towards terminal decline.


The President is Missing by President Bill Clinton and James Patterson

The President is Missing

The President is missing. The world is in shock. But the reason he’s missing is much worse than anyone can imagine. With details only a President could know, and the kind of suspense only James Patterson can deliver.


Us Against You by Fredrik Backman

Us Against You

Tucked in a forest in the frozen north, Beartown's residents are tough and hardworking. They don't expect life to be easy, but they do expect it to be fair. Which is why the sudden loss of their hockey players to the rival town of Hed hurts. Everyone needs something to cheer for in the long winter nights. Now they have nothing. So when a new star player arrives, Coach Peter sees an opportunity to rebuild the team - to take on Hed and restore Beartown's fortunes. But not everyone in town sees it his way. As the big game between both towns approaches, the rivalry turns bitter and all too real. Once the stands rumbled with threats to 'kill' and 'ruin' each other, but the residents didn't mean it. Now they do. By the time the last goal is scored, someone in Beartown will be dead . . .


Turning the Tide on Plastic: How Humanity (And You) Can Make Our Globe Clean Again by Lucy Siegle

Turning the Tide on Plastic

Enough plastic is thrown away every year to circle the world 4 times.

More than 8 million tonnes of plastic enter the oceans each year.

300 million tonnes of new plastic is produced every year.

An estimated 15-51 trillion pieces of plastic now litter the world's oceans.

38.5 million plastic bottles are used every day in the UK.

A million plastic bottles are used per minute around the world.

500 million plastic straws are used per year.

Without big action, at the current rate, pieces of plastic will outnumber fish in the ocean by 2050. That is the legacy we are leaving our children and grandchildren. Journalist, broadcaster and eco lifestyle expert Lucy Siegle provides a powerful call to arms to end the plastic pandemic along with the tools we need to make decisive change. It is a clear-eyed, authoritative and accessible guide to help us to take decisive and effective personal action.


Discovering the Boyne Valley by Noel French

Discovering the Boyne Valley

The Boyne Valley is a place of history, myths and legends. This rich valley is home to some of Ireland's most famous heritage sites and monuments - Tara, Newgrange, Kells and the Battle of the Boyne site - but there are many others including Trim Castle, Loughcrew, Monasterboice and Mellifont which are major attractions in their own right. A landscape of passage tombs, sacred hills, monastic ruins, bloody battlefields and heritage towns - no wonder the Boyne Valley is considered the birthplace of Ireland's Ancient East. The legends, stories and history of these places have been brought together by local historian and guide Noel French who has been studying and publishing in relation to the area for the past thirty years.


The Therapy House by Julie Parsons

The Therapy House

Garda Inspector Michael McLoughlin is trying to enjoy his retirement doing a bit of PI work on the side, meeting up with former colleagues, fixing up a grand old house in a genteel Dublin suburb near the sea. Then he discovers the body of his neighbour, a retired judge brutally murdered, shot through the back of the neck, his face mutilated beyond recognition. McLoughlin finds himself drawn into the murky past of the murdered judge, which leads him back to his own father s killing, decades earlier, by the IRA. In seeking the truth behind both crimes, a web of deceit, blackmail and fragile reputations comes to light, as McLoughlin s investigation reveals the explosive circumstances linking both crimes and dark secrets are discovered which would destroy the judge's legendary family name.


Orchid & the Wasp by Caoilinn Hughes

Orchid & the Wasp

Orchid & the Wasp brings to life the charged, compulsive voice of Gael Foess – daughter of a self-interested investment banker and a once-formidable orchestral conductor, and sister to a vulnerable younger brother – as she strives to build a life raft in the midst of economic and familial collapse. Moving by wits alone, Gael cuts a swathe through the leather-lined, coke-dusted social clubs of London, the New York gallery scene and birth-throes of the Occupy movement. 


After the Party by Cressida Connolly

After the Party

It is the summer of 1938 and Phyllis Forrester has returned to England after years abroad. Moving into her sister's grand country house, she soon finds herself entangled in a new world of idealistic beliefs and seemingly innocent friendships. Fevered talk of another war infiltrates their small, privileged circle, giving way to a thrilling solution: a great and charismatic leader, who will restore England to its former glory. At a party hosted by her new friends, Phyllis lets down her guard for a single moment, with devastating consequences. Years later, Phyllis, alone and embittered, recounts the dramatic events which led to her imprisonment and changed the course of her life forever.


The Blamed by Emily Hourican

The Blamed

It was the best summer of Anna's life. The summer she fell in love. The summer she found out who she was, and felt for the first time the great, magnetic pull of life, and knew she could have all of it.

But she was wrong -- and has been keeping a painful secret ever since.

Now, fifteen years later, Anna is struggling to get through to her troubled daughter -- named Jessie in memory of Anna's best friend. While once they were close, now Jessie keeps her mother at a distance, her every word and action a mystery. Though, sometimes, Anna wonders if Jessie can see right through her.

And when her daughter starts to ask questions about the past, and her namesake, Anna realises that the truth is threatening to escape and tip the delicate balance of their lives forever.


Promising Young Women by Caroline O'Donoghue

Promising Young Women

Jane Peters is an adrift twenty-something by day, and a world-weary agony aunt by night. But when an office party goes too far, Jane dissolves into the high-stakes world of being the Other Woman: a role she has the right advice for, but not the smarts to follow through on.

What starts out as a drunken mistake quickly unravels as Jane discovers that sex and power go hand-in-hand, and that it's hard to keep your head when you've become someone else's dirty little secret. And soon, her friendships, her sanity and even her life are put into jeopardy...


The Cruelty Men by Emer Martin

The Cruelty Men

Abandoned by her parents when they resettle in Meath, Mary O Conaill faces the task of raising her younger siblings alone. Padraig is disappeared, Sean joins the Christian Brothers, Bridget escapes and her brother Seamus inherits the farm. Maeve is sent to serve a family of shopkeepers in the local town. Later, pregnant and unwed, she is placed in a Magdalene Laundry where her twins are forcibly removed. Spanning the 1930s to the 70s, this sweeping multi-generational family saga follows the psychic and physical displacement of a society in freefall after independence. Wit, poetic nuance, vitality and authenticity inhabit this remarkable novel. The Cruelty Men tells an unsentimental tale of survival in a country proclaimed as independent but subjugated by silence.


Take Me In by Sabine Durrant

Take Me In

A hot beach. A young family on holiday. A fatal moment of inattention...

And now Dave Jepsom is in their lives.

Dave Jepsom, with his muscles, his pale eyes, his expressionless face.

He saved their child. How can they ever repay him? Especially as what he seems to want in return is everything.

He's in the streets they walk down. He's at the office where they work. He's at their front door, leaning on the bell...

If only they could go back. Back to when the lies were still hidden. Before the holiday, before the beach, before the moment that changed everything.

Before Dave.

But it's never how it starts that matters. It's always how it ends.


The Death of Mrs Westaway by Ruth Ware

The Death of Mrs Westaway

When Harriet Westaway receives an unexpected letter telling her she’s inherited a substantial bequest from her Cornish grandmother, it seems like the answer to her prayers. She owes money to a loan shark and the threats are getting increasingly aggressive: she needs to get her hands on some cash fast. 

There's just one problem - Hal's real grandparents died more than twenty years ago. The letter has been sent to the wrong person. But Hal knows that the cold-reading techniques she’s honed as a seaside fortune teller could help her con her way to getting the money. If anyone has the skills to turn up at a stranger's funeral and claim a bequest they’re not entitled to, it’s her. 

Hal makes a choice that will change her life for ever. But once she embarks on her deception, there is no going back. She must keep going or risk losing everything, even her life…


You Were Made for This by Michelle Sacks

You Were Made for This

Doting wife, devoted husband, cherished child. Merry, Sam and Conor are the perfect family in the perfect place. Merry adores baking, gardening, and caring for her infant son, while Sam pursues a new career in film. In their idyllic house in the Swedish woods, they can hardly believe how lucky they are. What perfect new lives they've built for themselves, away from New York and the events that overshadowed their happiness there.

And then Merry's closest friend Frank comes to stay. All their lives, the two women have been more like sisters than best friends. And that’s why Frank sees things that others might miss. Treacherous things that unfold behind closed doors.

But soon it's clear that everyone inside the house has something to hide. And as the truth begins to show through the cracks, Merry, Frank, and Sam grow all the more desperate to keep their picture-perfect lives intact.


One Good Reason by Susan Stairs

One Good Reason

Laura has never been like other girls. She thinks about sadness rather than feeling it. Anger, jealousy, deceit - they just seem more useful.

So when her family unit is shattered after a violent break-in to their home, she becomes intent on getting even. The perpetrators have walked away unpunished but her father wasn't so lucky, falling prey to a fatal heart attack in the aftermath.

Paddy Skellion - father of one of the offenders - is a renowned artist, who will go a long way to protect his reputation. When Laura's mother Angela gives her daughter her blessing to travel to the South of France, to visit the family in the hope of an apology, she knows little of Laura's true intent.

Laura has one good reason to enter their lives in ways they can't foresee. But even the best laid plans don't always go as intended...


Tom Clancy's Line of Sight by Mike Maden

Tom Clancy's Line of Sight

On a break between missions, Jack Ryan Jr is asked by his mother to visit Sarajevo and track down a girl whose life she saved during the war. Finally, he thinks, life might be quietening down.

That's until he meets Aida - grown from a child into a beautiful and selfless woman. Jack finds himself drawn to her, not to mention impressed by her dangerous work helping Syrian refugees enter Europe.

But the region is increasingly unstable, and just as Jack lets his guard down, Aida is violently kidnapped by the Serbian mafia.

With no official status, Jack's pleas for help fall on deaf ears, and he realises he must act alone to save the woman he loves. But as the simmering tensions threaten to bubble over, Jack will soon discover Bosnia is a dangerous place to fly solo . . .


The Bespoke Hitman by Sam Millar

The Bespoke Hitman

Halloween night. Belfast city centre. In the freezing, pelting rain, three men in wolf costumes decide to rob a bank. Everything goes awry for the bank robbers when the security systems do not run the way they expect!

About to flee empty handed, the youngest of the trio, Brian, confronts a customer who is gripping a large briefcase. The man, tall and very muscular strikes an intimating figure, and is not about to give up the briefcase easily. He is knocked over the head with a gun by Brian and falls into unconsciousness, his briefcase removed.

Back at base, the three are initially despondent at lack of success, until they open the briefcase. Over half a million pounds is inside. They can’t believe their luck. But why is the media reporting an attempted robbery instead of an actual one? And why no mention of the customer being assaulted? 

Mystery and intrigue follow and an exciting story unfolds in this crime thriller.


Soldiers of Liberty: A Study of Fenianism, 1858-1908 by Eva O Cathaoir

Soldiers of Liberty

Based on extensive archival research, this fascinating monograph rescues from obscurity the lives of over a thousand Fenians following the sesquicentennial year of 2017. Fenianism railed against the depopulation of a post-Famine Ireland, asserting the rights of ordinary people in defiance of the British Empire, then often supported by the emergent Catholic middle class. As a tenacious conspiracy, represented in these islands by the Irish Republican Brotherhood, Fenianism propagated an independent, egalitarian republic through travelling organizers and radical newspapers, inspired by the ideals of Theobald Wolfe Tone. Soldiers of Liberty traces the secret organization throughout Ireland, Britain, North America and Australasia, highlighting the contribution of Fenian women and the often tragic lives of committed activists, while revealing the hitherto-unknown fate of ubiquitous informers enlisted by Dublin Castle.


Jott: A John Murray Original by Sam Thompson

Jott

In February of 1935, two young Irishmen walk in the grounds of a London mental hospital. Arthur Bourne, a junior psychiatrist, is about to jeopardise his future for his closest friend, an aspiring writer called Louis Molyneux.

Arthur has been overshadowed since childhood by his brilliant, troubled friend. But after years of playing the unassuming companion, he is learning that loyalty has its costs: that old friendship may thwart new love, and perhaps even blur distinctions between the sane and the mad . . .

Jott is a story about friendship, madness and modernism from the author of the Man Booker-longlisted Communion Town.


Winning the Vote for Women: The 'Irish Citizen' newspaper and the suffrage movement in Ireland by Louise Ryan

Winning the Vote for Women

The campaign for women's votes in Ireland coincided with the nationalist movement, the First World War, the rise of the trade union movement, the cultural revival and, of course, the 1916 Rising. It culminated in 1918, with Ireland electing the first woman to parliament in London. However, the Irish suffrage movement was not a single-issue group. It did not merely campaign for votes, but also presented a feminist critique of the plight of Irish women in early twentieth-century society. The Irish Citizen newspaper, as the voice of the suffrage movement, provides an important insight into the various campaigns and concerns of this fascinating movement. The paper was self-consciously feminist, and, in addition to covering the major events of this tumultuous period, it addressed taboo subjects like rape, domestic violence, and child abuse. This book brings together extracts from the paper with analysis, commentary, and informative contextual background. First published in 1996 by Folena as "Irish Feminism and the Vote," this new edition has been comprehensively updated and revised.


Kindfulness: Be a true friend to yourself by Padraig O'Morain

Kindfulness

From the author of Mindfulness on the Go and Mindfulness for Worriers, this book teaches you how to make mindfulness your ally in everyday life, ways to accept who you are and how to lower anxiety and stress levels through a range of simple exercises. In today's chaotic world, it seems that everyone could benefit from joining the kindfulness movement.


Belfast Walks by Seth Linder

Belfast Walks

Hike through wooded glades and past plunging waterfalls, or stroll through the Titanic Quarter and hear about the city’s industrial history. Take the Van Morrison walk through the singer’s native East Belfast, or follow in the footsteps of football legend George Best and Narnia creator C.S. Lewis. See the famous republican and loyalist murals, or enjoy the spectacular view from Cave Hill.


The Rockingham Shoot and Other Dramatic Writings by John McGahern

The Rockingham Shoot and Other Dramatic Writings

John McGahern, the leading Irish novelist of his generation, wrote a substantial number of compelling scripts for radio and television. This volume brings together five of his produced works, at the heart of which sits the previously unpublished The Rockingham Shoot, a dark and powerful play for television that concerns a Nationalist teacher whose attempt to prevent his pupils beating at a pheasant shoot held in honour of the British Ambassador leads to a shockingly violent incident. Collectively, these dramatic works offer an evocative and often stark account of a deeply troubled and divided nation.


The Comeragh, Galtee, Knockmealdown & Slieve Bloom Mountains: A Walking Guide by John G. O'Dwyer

The Comeragh, Galtee, Knockmealdown & Slieve Bloom Mountains

John G. O'Dwyer's comprehensive guide to the best walks in Tipperary and Waterford has now been updated and expanded to include Laois and Offaly. From the rugged Comeragh coums to the stately peaks of the Galtees, and from myth-laden Slievenamon to the sequestered glens of the popular Slieve Bloom Mountains, there are walks to suit all tastes in these uplands. The most captivating outings the region has to offer are shared here, along with all the necessary practical information such as maps, directions, the degree of difficulty and estimated duration. But this is more than just a walking guide. Each route gets beneath the skin of this ancient landscape littered with historic artifacts. A booley on a hillside tells how the uplands contributed to human survival; a working farmstead demonstrates the continuation of this tradition; a ruined cottage confirms a battle lost. This guidebook will appeal to committed hillwalkers and casual ramblers alike, as well as containing much of interest to anyone who wishes to better understand the age-old interaction between humans and hills.


Irish Rebellions: 1798-1921 by Helen Litton

Irish Rebellions

The Irish rebellions through the years of Irish history beginning with the 1798 rebellion told through illustration and word. These engaging illustrations will bring to life some of the most pivotal events in Irish history. This illustrated history book will examine the rebellions of Ireland with a focus on the principal figures involved. Rebellions begun by Irish people who were not afraid to take on a powerful Establishment and claim their right to self-determination. This book covers six major rebellions in Irish History:

  • The Rebellion of 1798
  • The Rebellion of 1803
  • The Rebellion of 1848
  • The Fenian Campaigns
  • Easter Rising, 1916
  • The War of Independence


The Mourne and Cooley Mountains: A Walking Guide by Adrian Hendroff

The Mourne and Cooley Mountains: A Walking Guide

The Mourne and Cooley Mountains are quite simply a hiker s paradise. These exhilarating walks will take you to the highest point in Northern Ireland, to scenic Slieve Foye and the ancient summit of Slieve Gullion. On routes steeped in the legend of the Táin Bó Cúailgne, trek through picturesque woodlands. Discover the highest passage tomb in Ireland, use an old smugglers route and walk alongside tranquil reservoirs. The more ambitious will relish the Mourne Wall and Mourne Seven Sevens challenges, and some summits include optional scrambles to the top of dramatic granite tors or rocky outcrops. Each graded route is illustrated with photographs and specially drawn maps. Snippets on the rich flora, fauna, geology, history, heritage and folklore of each area are included throughout. So, get your walking boots on and discover the impressive landscape that inspired C.S. Lewis magical world of Narnia and served as the backdrop for Game of Thrones.


Good Trouble by Joseph O'Neill

Good Trouble

Back at dinner, somebody said that the goose thinks it’s a dog. No, it doesn’t. It doesn’t think it’s a dog. The goose doesn’t think. The goose just is. And what the goose is, is goose. But goose is not goose, Robert thinks. Even the goose isn’t goose.

In Good Trouble, the first story collection from Joseph O’Neill, author of Netherland, characters are forced to discover exactly who they are, and who they can never quite be.

There’s Rob, who swears he is a dependable member of society, but can’t scrape together a character reference to prove that’s the case. And Jayne, who has no choice but to investigate a strange noise downstairs while her husband lies glued to the bed with fear. A mother tries to find where she fits into her son’s new life of semi-soft rind-washed cheeses, and a poet tries to fathom what makes a poet. Do you even have to write poetry?

Packed with O’Neill’s trademark acerbic humour, Good Trouble explores the maddening and secretly political space between thoughts and deeds, between men and women, between goose and not-goose.


Love Will Tear Us Apart by Holly Seddon

Love Will Tear Us Apart

Sometimes a promise becomes a prison.

Fearing eternal singledom, childhood friends Kate and Paul make the age-old vow that if they don't find love by thirty, they will marry each other.

Years later, with the deadline of their 30th birthdays approaching, the unlikely couple decide to keep their teenage promise. After all, they are such good friends. Surely that's enough to make a marriage?

Now, on the eve of their 10th wedding anniversary, they will discover that love between men and women is more complex, and more precarious, than they could ever have imagined. As Kate struggles with a secret that reaches far into their past, will the couple's vow become the very thing that threatens their future?

Love Will Tear Us Apart is a moving and heart-breaking exploration of modern love and friendship, from the bestselling author of Try Not to Breathe.


How Do You Like Me Now? by Holly Bourne

How Do You Like Me Now?

Who the f*ck is Tori Bailey?

There's no doubt that Tori is winning the game of life. She's inspired millions of women to stick two fingers up at convention with her bestselling memoir, and she has the perfect relationship to boot.

But Tori Bailey has been living a lie.

Everyone around her is getting married and having babies, but her long-term boyfriend won't even talk about getting engaged. And when her best friend Dee - her plus one, the only person who understands the madness - falls in love, suddenly Tori's in terrifying danger of being left behind.

When the world tells you to be one thing and turning thirty brings with it a loud ticking clock, it takes courage to walk your own path.

It's time for Tori to practise what she's preached, but the question is: is she brave enough?

The debut adult novel by bestselling author Holly Bourne is a blisteringly funny, honest and moving exploration of love, friendship and navigating the emotional rollercoaster of your thirties.


The Killing Habit by Mark Billingham

The Killing Habit

We all know the signs. Cruelty, lack of empathy, the killing of animals. Now, pets on suburban London streets are being stalked by a shadow, and it could just be the start.

DI Tom Thorne knows the psychological profile of such offenders all too well, so when he is tasked with catching a notorious killer of domestic cats, he sees the chance to stop a series of homicides before they happen.

Others are less convinced, so once more, Thorne relies on DI Nicola Tanner to help him solve the case, before the culprit starts hunting people. It's a journey that brings them face to face with a killer who will tear their lives apart.


Violet Hill by Henrietta McKervey

Violet Hill

December 1918: Post-War London is grieving, the city a wound whose dressing was taken off too soon. Violet Hill, the only female private detective in the city, is hired by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's business manager to uncover spiritual trickery he believes is deceiving his employer.

January 2018: Susanna is a super-recogniser, one of an elite Met Police team of officers with extraordinary powers for facial recognition. When a freak injury causes her unusual ability to suddenly disappear, a dangerous criminal whom she no longer recognises decides to close in.

Compelling stories across two eras weave into this page-turning, literary adventure of identity, deception, danger - and detection.


The Anniversary by Roisin Meaney

The Anniversary

Lily and Charlie separated after twenty-six years of marriage. Now, with their divorce due to come through in a matter of months, Lily, newly engaged to the dependable Joe, decides to get the whole family together for one last weekend at Land's End, their old summer home by the sea. Lily has to break some news to Charlie, her daughter Poll and son Thomas -- news she knows they're not going to be happy about. But as the family makes their way to Land's End with their new partners, Lily's best laid plans are about to go awry. As Charlie's much younger girlfriend Chloe guards her own secret, Poll seems intent on sabotaging her apparently perfect relationship, while Thomas wrestles with a decision he knows could break his family apart. And amid the drama, they've forgotten that this weekend also just happens to be Lily and Charlie's wedding anniversary ...

Will all the couples survive the weekend intact?


The Path to Freedom: Articles and Speeches of Michael Collins by Michael Collins

The Path to Freedom

In these essays and speeches Michael Collins spelled out his vision for the future of Ireland, as well as his analysis of its past. Some of them are written in the anguish of a civil war which he struggled so hard to avoid, and in which he saw his country torn apart while seeking to establish and defend democracy, liberty and stability. Michael Collins' overall vision is still inspiring; he sees the necessity for open trade with overseas markets, for investment and management, and for putting the 'national economy on a sound footing' as a priority.


The Torchbearers by Bairbre Higgins

The Torchbearers

Seeking sanctuary, burnt-out fund manager Ariel Mignolet retreats to the New Mexican desert near Prospero, an isolated settlement steeped in religious fundamentalism. Long runs on remote trails and a new romance with local police officer Mike Argyll help forge a path back to sanity. But weeks into their relationship, Mike is brutally murdered and Ariel narrowly escapes the same fate. The ensuing investigation unearths the truth about powerful local figures whose acts of prejudice and deception have torn families apart for decades. As the FBI closes in on Mike’s killers, a broken man bent on revenge is planning to take another life and Ariel is getting in the way. Unfolding in a land of ghost towns and restless spirits, The Torchbearers is the story of how love for God and neighbour can turn deadly.


Cycling In Ireland: A guide to the best of Irish cycling by David Flanagan

Cycling In Ireland

This book documents the best cycling that Ireland has to offer. With eighty routes spread across the entire island, there is something for everyone; from gentle, traffic-free cycles, ideal for the whole family, to long challenging routes packed with relentless climbs. The routes range in length from 8km to 207km on a variety of surfaces including tarmac roads, gravel tracks, canal towpaths and singletrack. This comprehensive guide is packed full of detailed information and inspiring photography that is sure to appeal to everyone interested in cycling in Ireland.


Thirteen by Steve Cavanagh

Thirteen

Murder wasn't the hard part. It was just the start of the game. Joshua Kane has been preparing for this moment his whole life. He's done it before. But this is the big one. This is the murder trial of the century. And Kane has killed to get the best seat in the house. But there's someone on his tail. Someone who suspects that the killer isn't the man on trial. Kane knows time is running out - he just needs to get to the conviction without being discovered.


The Irish Regional Press, 1892-2012 by Ian Kenneally and James O'Donnell

The Irish Regional Press

From the fall of Parnell to the rise and fall of the Celtic Tiger, regional newspapers have documented the story of Ireland. In this book, historians and journalists describe the newspapers, editors and personalities that have made the local press such a vital part of social and political life throughout the island. In a highly centralized country, where Dublin is the hub of political and economic activity, these newspapers provide an alternative means through which to approach modern Irish history.


History of Violence by Edouard Louis and translated by Lorin Stein

History of Violence

I met Reda on Christmas Eve 2012. I was going home after a meal with friends, at around four in the morning. He approached me in the street, and finally I invited him up to my apartment. He told me the story of his childhood and how his father had come to France, having fled Algeria. We spent the rest of the night together, talking, laughing. At around 6 o'clock, he pulled out a gun and said he was going to kill me. He insulted me, strangled and raped me. The next day, the medical and legal proceedings began.

History of Violence retraces the story of that night, and looks at immigration, dispossession, racism, misery, desire and the effects of trauma in an attempt to understand, and to outline a history of violence, its origins, its reasons and its causes.


Her Name Was Rose by Claire Allan

Her Name Was Rose

When Emily lets a stranger step out in front of her, she never imagines that split second will change her life. But after Emily watches a car plough into the young mother – killing her instantly – she finds herself unable to move on. And then she makes a decision she can never take back. Because Rose had everything Emily had ever dreamed of. A beautiful, loving family, a great job and a stunning home. And now Rose’s husband misses his wife, and their son needs a mother. Why couldn’t Emily fill that space? But as Emily is about to discover, no one’s life is perfect … and not everything is as it seems.


All the Lives We Never Lived by Anuradha Roy

All the Lives We Never Lived

Freedom of a different kind is in the air across India. The fight against British rule is reaching a critical turn. The Nazis have come to power in Germany. At this point of crisis, two strangers arrive in Gayatri's town, opening up for her the vision of other possible lives. What took Myshkin's mother from India to Dutch-held Bali in the 1930s, ripping a knife through his comfortingly familiar environment? Excavating the roots of the world in which he was abandoned, Myshkin comes to understand the connections between anguish at home and a war-torn universe overtaken by patriotism.


The Shepherd's Hut by Tim Winton

The Shepherd's Hut

For years Jaxie Clackton has dreaded going home. His beloved mum is dead, and he wishes his dad was too, until one terrible moment leaves his life stripped to nothing. No one ever told Jaxie Clackton to be careful what he wishes for. And so Jaxie runs. There's just one person in the world who understands him, but to reach her he'll have to cross the vast saltlands of Western Australia. It is a place that harbours criminals and threatens to kill those who haven't reckoned with its hot, waterless vastness. This is a journey only a dreamer - or a fugitive - would attempt. Fierce and lyrical, The Shepherd's Hut by Tim Winton is a story of survival, solitude and unlikely friendship. Most of all it is about what it takes to keep hope alive in a parched and brutal world.


The Poison Bed by E C Fremantle

The Poison Bed

In the autumn of 1615 scandal rocks the Jacobean court when a celebrated couple are imprisoned on suspicion of murder. She is young, captivating and from a notorious family. He is one of the richest and most powerful men in the kingdom.

Some believe she is innocent; others think her wicked or insane. He claims no knowledge of the murder. The king suspects them both, though it is his secret at stake.

Who is telling the truth? Who has the most to lose? And who is willing to commit murder?


Summerland by Hannu Rajaniemi

Summerland

How do you catch a spy who's already dead?  In 1938, death is no longer feared but exploited.

Since the discovery of the afterlife, the British Empire has extended its reach into Summerland, a metropolis for the recently deceased.

But Britain isn't the only contender for power in this life and the next. The Soviets have spies in Summerland, and the technology to build their own god.

When SIS agent Rachel White gets a lead on one of the Soviet moles, blowing the whistle puts her hard-earned career at risk. The spy has friends in high places, and she will have to go rogue to bring him in.


Watching You by Lisa Jewell

Watching You

You’re back home after four years working abroad, new husband in tow.
You’re keen to find a place of your own. But for now you’re crashing in your big brother’s spare room.
That’s when you meet the man next door.
He’s the head teacher at the local school. Twice your age. Extraordinarily attractive. You find yourself watching him.
All the time.
But you never dreamed that your innocent crush might become a deadly obsession.
Or that someone is watching you.


Your Closest Friend by Karen Perry

Your Closest Friend

Cara shouldn't have survived the attack.

But at the last moment, a stranger snatched her to safety.

In the hours that followed she told this Good Samaritan secrets she'd never told a soul.

Not even her husband . . .

 

In the aftermath, Cara is home, healed and safe.

Which is when the anonymous threats begin.

Someone knows things about her they shouldn't.

Cara's Good Samaritan offers to help her - to save her all over again.

That night Cara made a friend for life.

But what if she isn't a friend at all?


Dead If You Don't by Peter James

Dead If You Don't

Kipp Brown, successful businessman and compulsive gambler, is having the worst run of luck of his life. He’s beginning to lose, big style. However, taking his teenage son, Mungo, to their club’s Saturday afternoon football match should have given him a welcome respite, if only for a few hours. But it’s at the stadium where his nightmare begins.

Within minutes of arriving at the game, Kipp bumps into a client. He takes his eye off Mungo for a few moments, and in that time, the boy disappears. Then he gets the terrifying message that someone has his child, and to get him back alive, Kipp will have to pay.

Defying instruction not to contact the police, Kipp reluctantly does just that, and Detective Superintendent Roy Grace is brought in to investigate. At first it seems a straightforward case of kidnap. But rapidly Grace finds himself entering a dark, criminal underbelly of the city, where the rules are different and nothing is what it seems . . .


Rosie: Scenes from a Vanished Life by Rose Tremain

Rosie: Scenes from a Vanished Life

Rose Tremain grew up in post-war London, a city of grey austerity, still partly in ruins, where both food and affection were fiercely rationed. The girl known then as ‘Rosie’ and her sister Jo spent their days longing for their grandparents' farm, buried deep in the Hampshire countryside, a green paradise of feasts and freedom, where they could at last roam and dream.

But when Rosie is ten years old, everything changes. She and Jo lose their father, their London house, their school, their friends, and -- most agonisingly of all -- their beloved Nanny, Vera, the only adult to have shown them real love and affection.

Briskly dispatched to a freezing boarding-school in Hertfordshire, they once again feel like imprisoned castaways. But slowly the teenage Rosie escapes from the cold world of the Fifties, into a place of inspiration and mischief, of loving friendships and dedicated teachers, where a young writer is suddenly ready to be born.


Genesis by Brendan Reichs

Genesis

Noah Livingston knows he is destined to survive.

The sixty-four members of his class are trapped in a place where morals have no meaning and zero rules apply.

Min Wilder knows that survival alone isn't enough.

In a violent world where brute force passes for leadership, Min's instincts rebel against allowing others to decide who lives and who dies. She's ready to fight for what she believes in. And against whoever might stand in her way.


Letters To My Daughters by Emma Hannigan

Letters To My Daughters

Throughout their lives, the three Brady sisters have always been closer to their nanny May than to their own mother, Martha a busy midwife. May always thought of them as her daughters so when she dies suddenly, the sisters are left devastated -- especially when they learn that letters intended for them from May with final words of advice and love have gone missing.

But what words of advice could the sisters need?

Beatrice, owner of exclusive wedding boutiques, is busy and fulfilled. Rose has a beautiful daughter, a luxurious home and a thriving interiors company. And Jeannie, married to a wealthy plastic surgeon in L.A., wants for nothing.

Except that each of the sisters carries a secret ...

And as they gather for the reading of May's will in Dublin, they must face some life-changing decisions. Will they ever learn the words of advice May had for them, and discover who took the letters?


The Trick To Time by Kit De Waal

The Trick To Time

Mona is a young Irish girl in the big city, with the thrill of a new job and a room of her own in a busy boarding house. On her first night out in 1970s Birmingham, she meets William, a charming Irish boy with an easy smile and an open face. They embark upon a passionate affair, a whirlwind marriage - before a sudden tragedy tears them apart.

Decades later, Mona pieces together the memories of the years that separate them. But can she ever learn to love again?

The Trick to Time is an unforgettable tale of grief, longing, and a love that lasts a lifetime.


Million Love Songs by Carole Matthews

Million Love Songs

Ruby Brown is ready for a change.
She's single for the first time in years and she's going to dive into this brave new world with a smile on her face and a spring in her step. The last thing she's looking for is a serious relationship.

Mason represents everything Ruby wants right now: he's charming, smooth and perfect for some no-strings-attached fun. Joe on the other hand is kind and attractive, but comes with the sort of baggage Ruby wants to avoid: an annoyingly attractive ex-wife and two teenage children.

Ruby thinks she knows what she wants, but is it what she needs to be truly happy? It's about to get emotional in Million Love Songs.

 


Tangerine by Christine Mangan

Tangerine

The last person Alice Shipley expected to see since arriving in Tangier with her new husband was Lucy Mason. After the horrific accident at Bennington, the two friends - once inseparable roommates - haven't spoken in over a year. But Lucy is standing there, trying to make things right.

Perhaps Alice should be happy. She has not adjusted to life in Morocco, too afraid to venture out into the bustling medinas and oppressive heat. Lucy, always fearless and independent, helps Alice emerge from her flat and explore the country.

But soon a familiar feeling starts to overtake Alice - she feels controlled and stifled by Lucy at every turn. Then Alice's husband, John, goes missing, and Alice starts to question everything around her: her relationship with her enigmatic friend, her decision to ever come to Tangier, and her very own state of mind.

Tangerine is an extraordinary debut, so tightly wound, so evocative of 1950s Tangier, and so cleverly plotted that it will leave you absolutely breathless.


Overland by Graham Rawle

Overland

Welcome to Overland! Where the California sun shines down on synthetic grass and plastic oranges bedeck the trees all year round. Steam billows gently from the chimney tops and the blue tarpaulin lake is open for fishing…

Hollywood set-designer George Godfrey has been called on to do his patriotic duty and he doesn’t believe in half-measures. If he is going to hide an American aircraft plant from the threat of Japanese aerial spies he has an almighty job on his hands. He will need an army of props and actors to make the Lockheed factory vanish behind the semblance of a suburban town. Every day, his “Residents” climb through a trapdoor in the factory roof to shift model cars, shop for imaginary groceries and rotate fake sheep in felt-green meadows.

Overland is a beacon for the young women labouring below it: Queenie, dreaming of movie stardom while welding sheet metal; Kay, who must seek refuge from the order to intern “All Persons of Japanese Ancestry”. Meanwhile, George’s right-hand Resident, Jimmy, knows that High Command aren’t at all happy with the camouflage project...

With George so bewitched by his own illusion, might it risk confusing everybody – not just the enemy?

Overland is a book like no other -- to be read in landscape format. Based on true events, it is a novel where characters' dreams and desires come down to earth with more than a bump, confronting the hardships of life during wartime. As surreal and playful as it is affecting and unsettling, no-one other than Graham Rawle could have created it.


A Breath After Drowning by Alice Blanchard

A Breath After Drowning

Child psychiatrist Kate Wolfe's world comes crashing down when one of her young patients commits suicide, so when a troubled girl is left at the hospital ward, she doubts her ability to help. But the girl knows things about Kate's past, things she shouldn't know, forcing Kate to face the murky evidence surrounding her own sister s murder sixteen years before. A murder for which a man is about to be executed. Unearthing secrets about her own family, and forced to face both her difficult relationship with her distant father and the possibility that her mother might also have met a violent end, the shocking final twist brings Kate face to face with her deepest fear.


The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris

The Tattooist of Auschwitz

In 1942, Lale Sokolov arrived in Auschwitz-Birkenau. He was given the job of tattooing the prisoners marked for survival - scratching numbers into his fellow victims' arms in indelible ink to create what would become one of the most potent symbols of the Holocaust.

Waiting in line to be tattooed, terrified and shaking, was a young girl. For Lale - a dandy, a jack-the-lad, a bit of a chancer - it was love at first sight. And he was determined not only to survive himself, but to ensure this woman, Gita, did, too.

So begins one of the most life-affirming, courageous, unforgettable and human stories of the Holocaust: the love story of the tattooist of Auschwitz.


Two Steps Forward by Graeme Simsion and Anne Buist

Two Steps Forward

A smart and funny story from the author of The Rosie Project - two misfits walk 2,000 km along the Camino to find themselves and, perhaps, each other. A novel of second chances and reinvention from Graeme Simsion, and his wife Anne Buist. Optioned for film by Ellen deGeneres, and now an international bestseller.

Zoe, a sometime artist, is from California. Martin, an engineer, is from Yorkshire. Both have ended up in picturesque Cluny, in central France. Both are struggling to come to terms with their recent past - for Zoe, the death of her husband; for Martin, a messy divorce.

Looking to make a new start, each sets out alone to walk two thousand kilometres from Cluny toSantiago de Compostela, in northwestern Spain, in the footsteps of pilgrims who have walked the Camino (the Way) for centuries. The Camino changes you, it's said. It's a chance to find a new version of yourself, and a new beginning. But can these two very different people find themselves? Will they find each other?

In this smart, funny and romantic journey, Martin's and Zoe's stories are told in alternating chapters by husband-and-wife team Graeme Simsion and Anne Buist.Two Steps Forward is a novel about renewal - physical, psychological and spiritual. It's about the challenge of walking a long distance and of working out where you are going. And it's about what you decide to keep, what you choose to leave behind and what you rediscover along the way.

Optioned by Fox Searchlight for Ellen DeGeneres to produce through A Very Good Production.


Macbeth by Jo Nesbo

Macbeth

He’s the best cop they’ve got. When a drug bust turns into a bloodbath it’s up to Inspector Macbeth and his team to clean up the mess. He’s also an ex-drug addict with a troubled past.

He’s rewarded for his success. Power. Money. Respect. They’re all within reach. But a man like him won’t get to the top.

Plagued by hallucinations and paranoia, Macbeth starts to unravel. He’s convinced he won’t get what is rightfully his.

Unless he kills for it.


The Woman in the Woods by John Connolly

The Woman in the Woods

The new thrilling instalment of John Connolly's popular Charlie Parker series.

It is spring, and the semi-preserved body of a young Jewish woman is discovered buried in the Maine woods. It is clear that she gave birth shortly before her death.

But there is no sign of a baby.

Private detective Charlie Parker is engaged by the lawyer Moxie Castin to shadow the police investigation and find the infant, but Parker is not the only searcher. Someone else is following the trail


The Fallen by David Baldacci

The Fallen

Amos Decker, David Baldacci's unique special agent with the gift of a remarkable memory, returns in The Fallen.

Small towns which have seen better times are not unusual. But the mysterious events in Baronville, Pennsylvania, are raising the highly-tuned antennae of agent Amos Decker and his FBI partner, Alex Jamison. What was supposed to be a relaxing vacation turns into a murder investigation when two bodies are found in a nearby deserted house.

With the body count rising, Decker and Jamison dig deep to uncover a sinister truth in Baronville, which could be the canary in the coalmine for the rest of the country.

But even the duo’s skills and Amos Decker’s infallible memory may not be enough to save this town, or them, from becoming the next victims


Anna and Theo by Amanda Prowse

Anna and Theo

From the heartbreaking, uplifting and bestselling Amanda Prowse, this is an unforgettable romance about what happens when two very different people fall in love in two books by Amanda Prowse; Anna and Theo

Anna (Published in March)

There are two sides to every love story. This is Anna's.

Anna Cole grew up poor, but her mother's love made her feel rich every day. Then her mother died, and Anna was sent to a care home. As a teenager, Anna vowed that one day, she would have children of her own, and create the happy, noisy family life she always craved. Then, one day, Anna meets Theo Montgomery in a lift. Theo has kind eyes, but a sad past. His family were rich, but his childhood was full of neglect. Theo can't imagine bringing a child into this cruel world, but he does want a soulmate. Someone to love him unconditionally; someone with whom he can share his family's wealth.

Theo (Published in April)

This is Theo's side of the story.

Theo Montgomery grew up in a rich family where he had all the toys and trinkets money could buy. But his childhood was full of neglect and he was bullied at school. Now he is an adult, he longs to find a soulmate. Someone who understands him. Someone who will love him unconditionally. Then, one day, Theo meets Anna Cole in a lift. Anna grew up in a care home, and has always wanted to create the noisy family life she never had. She brings love and laughter into Theo's life. But she wants a baby, and Theo can't imagine bringing a child into this cruel world...

Theo and Anna are two damaged souls, from two different worlds. Is their love for each other enough to let go of the pain of their pasts? Or will Anna and Theo break each others' hearts?

 

 


Almost Love by Louise O'Neill

Almost Love

When Sarah falls for Matthew, she falls hard.So it doesn't matter that he's twenty years older. That he sees her only in secret. That, slowly but surely, she's sacrificing everything else in her life to be with him. Sarah's friends are worried. Her father can't understand how she could allow herself to be used like this. And she's on the verge of losing her job. But Sarah can't help it. She is addicted to being desired by Matthew. And love is supposed to hurt. Isn't it?


The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin

The Immortalists

It's 1969, and holed up in a grimy tenement building in New York's Lower East Side is a travelling psychic who claims to be able to tell anyone the date they will die. The four Gold children, too young for what they're about to hear, sneak out to learn their fortunes.

Such prophecies could be dismissed as trickery and nonsense, yet the Golds bury theirs deep. Over the years that follow they attempt to ignore, embrace, cheat and defy the 'knowledge' given to them that day - but it will shape the course of their lives forever.


What are We Doing Here? by Marilynne Robinson

What are We Doing Here?

New essays by the Orange and Pulitzer Prize winning author of Gilead, Home and Lila. In this collection, Marilynne Robinson, one of today's most important thinkers - admired by President Obama, and so many others - impels us to action and offers us hope.

Marilynne Robinson has plumbed the human spirit in her renowned novels, including Lila, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award; Home, winner of the Orange Prize; and Gilead, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. In this new essay collection she trains her incisive mind on our modern political climate and the mysteries of faith. Whether she is investigating how the work of great thinkers about America like Emerson and Tocqueville inform our political consciousness or discussing the way that beauty informs and disciplines daily life, Robinson's peerless prose and boundless humanity are on full display. What Are We Doing Here? is a call to continue the tradition of the great thinkers and to remake political and cultural life as "deeply impressed by obligation [and as] a great theatre of heroic generosity, which, despite all, is sometimes palpable still." In our era of rampant political and cultural pessimism, we run the risk of becoming bogged down in disillusionment and of losing sight of ways out of the mire. In What Are We Doing Here?, the incomparable Marilynne Robinson offers us balm: impelling us to action, but offering us hope.


Exposure by Helen Dunmore by Helen Dunmore

Exposure by Helen Dunmore

This book is by the Sunday Times best-selling author of The Lie. Forbidden love, intimate betrayal and the devastating power of exposure drive Helen Dunmore's remarkable new novel. London, November, 1960: the Cold War is at its height. Spy fever fills the newspapers, and the political establishment knows how and where to bury its secrets. When a highly sensitive file goes missing, Simon Callington is accused of passing information to the Soviets, and arrested. His wife, Lily, suspects that his imprisonment is part of a cover-up, and that more powerful men than Simon will do anything to prevent their own downfall. She knows that she too is in danger, and must fight to protect her children. But what she does not realise is that Simon has hidden vital truths about his past, and may be found guilty of another crime that carries with it an even greater penalty


The Dead Student by John Katzenbach by John Katzenbach

The Dead Student by John Katzenbach

 

A master of the psychological thriller, bestselling author John Katzenbach is an unrivaled investigator of that most primal human motive—revenge. A tense, penetrating novel, The Dead Student follows a young man set on avenging his uncle, no matter the consequences.

Timothy Warner, a PhD student who goes by the nickname “Moth,” wakes up on his ninety-ninth day of sobriety with an intense craving for drink. He asks his uncle Ed, a former alcoholic and now successful psychiatrist, to meet him at an AA meeting later that day. When Ed doesn't show up, Moth bikes to his office and discovers a grisly scene—his uncle lying in a pool of blood, shot through the temple. The police pronounce the death a suicide, but Moth refuses to believe that his uncle would take his own life. Devastated and confused, he calls on the only person he thinks he can trust: Andrea Martine, an ex-girlfriend he has not spoken to in years.

Each battling their inner demons, Moth and Andy travel into dark, unfamiliar territory, intent on finding out the truth about Ed’s death and circling ever closer to a devious mind that will flinch at nothing to achieve his own goal of revenge.


The High Mountains of Portugal by Yann Martel by Yann Martel

The High Mountains of Portugal by Yann Martel

 

In Lisbon in 1904, a young man named Tomás discovers an old journal. It hints at the existence of an extraordinary artifact that—if he can find it—would redefine history. Traveling in one of Europe’s earliest automobiles, he sets out in search of this strange treasure.

Thirty-five years later, a Portuguese pathologist devoted to the murder mysteries of Agatha Christie finds himself at the center of a mystery of his own and drawn into the consequences of Tomás’s quest.

Fifty years on, a Canadian senator takes refuge in his ancestral village in northern Portugal, grieving the loss of his beloved wife. But he arrives with an unusual companion: a chimpanzee. And there the century-old quest will come to an unexpected conclusion.

The High Mountains of Portugal—part quest, part ghost story, part contemporary fable—offers a haunting exploration of great love and great loss. Filled with tenderness, humor, and endless surprise, it takes the reader on a road trip through Portugal in the last century—and through the human soul.


The Drowned Detective by Neil Jordan by Neil Jordan

The Drowned Detective by Neil Jordan

Jonathan is a private investigator in a decaying eastern European city, consumed by his work and his failing marriage. Approached one day by an elderly couple, he is presented with a faded photograph of their daughter, missing for nearly two decades. Troubled by the image of the little girl, who was the same age when she vanished as his own daughter is now – he is compelled to find her.

But one night, soon after taking on the case, as he walks across the bridge spanning the river that divides the city, he encounters a young woman crouched at the foot of a stone angel – a woman who suddenly leaps into the icy water below. Without thinking, Jonathan plunges after her, and is soon drawn into her ghostly world of confusion, coincidence and intrigue, and the city he thought he knew turns strange and threatening.

 


Making It Up as I Go Along by Marian Keyes by Marian Keyes

Making It Up as I Go Along by Marian Keyes

Welcome to the magnificent Making It Up as I Go Along - aka the World According to Marian Keyes - A bold, brilliant book bursting with Marian's hilarious and heartfelt observations on modern life, love and much, much else besides.

Such as? you are determined to ask.

Well, how about her guide to breaking up with your hairdresser? Or the warning she has for us all after a particularly traumatic fling with fake tan. There's the pure and bounteous joy of the nail varnish museum. Not to mention the very best lies to tell if you find yourself on an Arctic cruise. She has words of advice for those fast approaching fifty. And she's here to tell you the secret secret truth about writers - well, this one anyway.

You'll be wincing in recognition and scratching your head in incredulity, but like Marian herself you won't be able to stop laughing at the sheer delightful absurdity that is modern life - because each and every one of us is clearly making it up as we go along.